I recently sat down to record a series of screencasts that introduces Windows 8 to developers. The goal is to give developers a high level understanding of Windows 8 so they can have some initial familiarity with the platform without feeling like they have to commit to a technology deep-dive. Each video is short (under five minutes) and to the point. Over the next several days I’ll be introducing them to you here on the blog. The fourth video is about tiles and notifications. In this episode I talk about how you can make your apps feel alive with tiles and push notifications. Click the picture below to start watching and enjoy!

lap-around-win8-04-tiles-notifications-thumb

Next up “Contracts”

Previous videos

lap-around-win8-01-tools-thumblap-around-win8-02-building-apps-thumblap-around-win8-03-hardware-thumb

I recently sat down to record a series of screencasts that introduces Windows 8 to developers. The goal is to give developers a high level understanding of Windows 8 so they can have some initial familiarity with the platform without feeling like they have to commit to a technology deep-dive. Each video is short (under five minutes) and to the point. Over the next several days I’ll be introducing them to you here on the blog. The third video is about hardware. In this episode I talk about how you can integrate your Windows 8 Metro style apps with device hardware. Click the picture below to start watching and enjoy!

lap-around-win8-03-hardware-thumb

Next up “Tiles and Notifications”

Previous videos

lap-around-win8-01-tools-thumblap-around-win8-02-building-apps-thumb

{Analysis}

Amazon

Apple

Google

Microsoft

Sencha

Xamarin

{Analysis}

Amazon

Apprenda

Cloud Foundry

Eucalyptus

Google

Microsoft

Rackspace

I recently sat down to record a series of screencasts that introduces Windows 8 to developers. The goal is to give developers a high level understanding of Windows 8 so they can have some initial familiarity with the platform without feeling like they have to commit to a technology deep-dive. Each video is short (under five minutes) and to the point. Over the next several days I’ll be introducing them to you here on the blog. The second video is about building apps. In this episode Adam I talk about how XAML and HTML developers can leverage Windows 8 platform components from within their applications. Click the picture below to start watching and enjoy!

lap-around-win8-02-building-apps-thumb

Next up “Hardware”

Previous videos

lap-around-win8-01-tools-thumb

I recently sat down to record a series of screencasts that introduces Windows 8 to developers. The goal is to give developers a high level understanding of Windows 8 so they can have some initial familiarity with the platform without feeling like they have to commit to a technology deep-dive. Each video is short (under five minutes) and to the point. Over the next several days I’ll be introducing them to you here on the blog. The first video is about tools. In this episode I talk about the tools available to both XAML and HTML developers for creating Windows 8 Metro style apps. Click the image below to start watching and enjoy!

lap-around-win8-01-tools-thumb

Next up “Building Apps”

metro-pass-0020

(For an overview of this series, please read this post.)

MSDN Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465400.aspx & http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465362.aspx

While Windows 8 provides developers with the opportunity to distribute their apps to millions of users around the world, it also presents challenges when it comes to making it great looking apps. The primary challenge has to do with the fact that Windows 8 will run on a wide variety of form factors. I harken back to the days of Windows Mobile (not Windows Phone) development where, more often than not, developers would need to create a UI for each device their apps would target. Not an ideal scenario. Will developers need to do the same for Windows 8 Metro style apps? Not necessarily. After all, Windows 8 offers built-in scaling out of the box to ensure that apps and content look great. To ensure apps look great when scaled, developers just need to make sure they use a fluid layout and scalable graphics.

Below is a list of what to do and not to  do when it comes to scaling on Windows 8:

Do Don’t
Use scalable vector graphics Don’t use smaller images that are scaled up
Use resource loading for bitmap images in the app package Don’t use larger images that are scaled down
Use the resolution media query for remote web images Avoid specifying sizes that aren’t multiples of 5px
Use the File Access Thumbnail APIs for user images on the file system  
Manually load images based upon scale percentage at runtime  
Specify width and height for your images  
Use typographic grid-units and sub-units  

For details about about each of these, visit the MSDN source links.

MSDN Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465400.aspx & http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465362.aspx

Just a quick note, I’ll be taking a break from the Metro Pass series for the next couple of weeks as I have a number of other topics I’d like to cover.

On August 21, 2012, I and several of my RBA colleagues will be presenting at the Denver Azure User Group. We’ll be covering the new features available in Windows Azure. Below is short description of the session:

In June Microsoft changed the game in cloud computing by releasing previews of new Windows Azure services which simplify building applications that span cloud and on-premises servers.

Key highlights include of the release include:

  • New Windows Azure Virtual Machine capabilities, including Windows Server and Linux support.
  • Virtual networking between Windows Azure and your on-premises infrastructure.
  • Windows Azure Web Sites for website and Web application development.
  • Improved developer productivity with added support for Python and a new Eclipse plugin for Java.
  • Improved application services.
  • A new Windows Azure Management Portal for easier application management and monitoring.

In this session we’ll introduce you to these new Windows Azure services and show you how you can use them to bring your applications to the cloud.

You can find it our more details about the event and register here: https://clicktoattend.microsoft.com/en-us/Pages/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=161339

I hope to see you there!

ag

metro-pass-0019

(For an overview of this series, please read this post.)

MSDN Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/hh848075(v=vs.85).aspx & http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465410.aspx

In order for you Windows 8 Metro style app to be published to the Windows Store it must pass Microsoft’s testing process. Fortunately, for you, you can run your apps through a number of Microsoft’s tests by simply using the Windows App Certification Kit (ACK). The ACK is used to validate compliance with certification requirements, and replaces the Windows Software Logo Kit (WSLK) used for validation in the Windows 7 Software Logo program. Desktop, desktop device, and Metro style apps can be certified. The Windows ACK is included in the Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) and the Windows SDK for Metro style apps.

The ACK tests your Metro style applications in the following categories:

App failures

The app must not crash or hang. App failures, such as crashes and hangs, disrupt and frustrate customers. Eliminating such failures improves app stability and reliability, and overall, provides customers with a better experience.

App manifest

The app manifest must contain all the required attributes.

Windows security features

The app must use Windows security features.

Supported platform APIs

The app must use only APIs from the Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) for Metro style Apps.

Startup performance

The app should have a fast and responsive startup experience while consuming a reasonable amount of system resources (CPU, file IO, memory, and so on) to enable fast switching and multitasking between previously unopened apps.

Suspend performance

The app should have a fast and responsive suspend experience while consuming a reasonable amount of system resources (CPU, File IO, Memory, and so on) and making sure that resources are released efficiently.

App package resource validation

The app manifest must have valid resources defined in the resources.pri file, as explained in the App package manifest schema.

.NET version check

The app must use .NET 4.5 or later.

To be clear, desktop (non-Metro style) apps do not have to be certified to run on Windows 8. However, desktop apps, like Metro apps, must be certified in order to be listed in the Windows Store.

MSDN Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/hh848075(v=vs.85).aspx & http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/apps/hh465410.aspx

{Analysis}

Apple

Microsoft

Xamarin